Facilitation and collective action back on the menu… big time!


(Disclaimer for Nadia, Russell and others who commented on this post [and see feedback/results here by the way]: This post was drafted before and thus does not yet reflect some of the changes that I hope to bring into this blog based on your collective feedback…) Lots of different happenings in the world of event/process facilitation […]

(You’re not welcome) On the dark side of co-facilitation


Meanwhile, another excellent KM4Dev conversation is raging, on the topic of defining ‘what a facilitator is‘. Among other contributions, my fellow facilitator, KM4Dev mate and friend Nancy White shared a list of issues related to the dark side of facilitation… “The real life and dark sides of a facilitator below. I’m sure there are a few […]

KM for Development Journal news, zooming in on the facilitation of multi-stakeholder processes


Some news about the Knowledge Management for Development Journal, for which I’m a senior editor: the upcoming issue (May 2013) is just about to be released and will be the first open access issue again after three years of commercial hosting by Taylor and Francis. This is a really welcome move – back to open knowledge […]

Musings about learning about action about change in an Exchange


Last week I was on the premises of the Institute for Development Studies (IDS) in the UK co-facilitating an interesting Knowledge Exchange about ‘Acting on what we know and how we learn for climate and development policy‘. Together with fellow co-facilitators Pete Cranston and Carl Jackson and with the benediction of the CGIAR research program […]

All the mistakes you make, all the promises you break… in your events


Should’ve seen it coming a lot earlier… that mistake that was so familiar when it happened again. Or rather: those mistakes… I just ended a streak of five events in four weeks to facilitate in the past four weeks and when repetition happens, the danger of the auto-mode is glowing in the dark. Auto-mode is […]

Reducing complexity to a workshop? Wake & step up!


A short shoot post today. The white screen syndrome is kinda hitting me at the moment. But one thing is coming to mind: the delusion of packing the complexity of multi-faceted, multi-stakeholder, multi-perspective programs into planning activities in a planning workshop of one, two or even three days. I have recently facilitated a number of […]

Complexity in multi-stakeholder processes – how to manage, facilitate or navigate around it?


After almost five weeks without any blogging, I’m definitely coming to terms with the blank page/blank mind syndrome. A very useful experience – this drought of ideas – as it just reveals how daily mental discipline and a conscious effort of connecting thoughts is the ignition I need to let inspiration flow. Holiday had been […]

The chemistry of magical facilitation (2b) – And play more with the BOSSY HERALD!


In the second part of this second chapter on the chemistry of magical (event) facilitation, I will examine the attendance (the participants), the location and the dynamics of the event, the other three crucial elements to make the HERALD play for you, as well as the matter at hand: the content. Attendance (the participants) The […]

Harnessing the power of introverts – a LinkedIn discussion


Introverts are definitely the talk of town then… After a last post touching upon the matter of introverts and social media, I landed in a fascinating LinkedIn discussion about introverts and how to facilitate workshops so as to harness their power. Emma Konopka started this conversation on the basis of a blog post and of […]

The chemistry of magical facilitation (2) – Put the bossy herald to play for you


Facilitation is the art of seamlessly inviting all contributions to collective sense-making. As such it is an essential element of knowledge sharing, knowledge management and social learning. So, in the previous chapter of this series, we’ve looked at the big picture of facilitation, how to handle the BOSSY HERALD, particularly in its bossy part. Let’s assume […]